Last edited by Samurisar
Monday, May 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of Irish Scots and the Scotch-Irish found in the catalog.

Irish Scots and the Scotch-Irish

John C. Linehan

Irish Scots and the Scotch-Irish

an historical and ethnological monograph, with some reference to Scotia Major and Scotia Minor : to which is added a chapter on "How the irish came as builders of the nation"

by John C. Linehan

  • 236 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by The American-Irish Historical Society in Concord, New Hampshire .
Written in English


Edition Notes

General index p129-138.

Statementby John C. Linehan.
ContributionsAmerican-Irish Historical Society.
The Physical Object
Pagination138p. :
Number of Pages138
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21144557M

This article discusses Scots-Irish Surnames. How does one go about hiring someone to analize a group of surnames? I have 3 male cousins who match each other at the 67 marker level, but they also match a multitude of other men at the same level with different, mostly Irish surnames. Searching for Scotch-Irish Roots in Scottish Records Dobson, D., Clearfield, VREF DOBS This book identifies source material in Scottish libraries and archives that could enable people of Scotch-Irish ancestry to locate their Scottish : Steve Walker.

Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia Volume I AUGUSTA COUNTY COURT ORDERS. These notes are from the Order Book of the County Court, which contains the entries of the proceedings of the Court at its daily sittings during the terms. The terms were held monthly. The reference is in each case to the Book in which the order noted is.   To avoid the derogatory connotations of the name “Scotch Irish,” scholars today prefer the labels “Scots Irish,” “Ulster Irish” or “Ulster Presbyterian.” Divided into six chapters, this concise book focuses on the experience and contributions of Scots Irish men and women to Pennsylvania from to

It was only after the Irish Potato Famine in the ’s that the descendants of earlier immigrants from Ireland began identifying themselves as Scotch-Irish, or Scots-Irish. This was primarily to distinguish themselves from the newer Irish immigrants from the famine, who were largely Roman Catholic, with no Scottish ancestry.   He divides his book into three parts:the Scot in , the Scots in Ireland, the Scotch-Irish in America. Being a southerner with Scotch-Irish roots in Tennessee, I was upset early on when Leyburn stated that Teddy Roosevelt's and others' claims that the Scotch-Irish were hardy, honorable folk was by:


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Irish Scots and the Scotch-Irish by John C. Linehan Download PDF EPUB FB2

In his first work of nonfiction, bestselling novelist James Webb tells the epic story of the Scots-Irish, a people whose lives and worldview were dictated by resistance, conflict, and struggle, and who, in turn, profoundly influenced the social, political, and cultural landscape of America from its beginnings through the present by:   “Scots and Scotch-Irish” Frontier Life in North Carolina, Virginia and Kentucky, by Larry Hoefling This little book is a fun read.

It doesn’t aspire to be an exhaustive history but it does a good job of showing the reader the general immigration patterns and lifeways of the Scots and Scotch-Irish Folks who came to “the New World” in /5(20).

Format: Hardcover Chepesiuk presents an overview for the general reader which is somewhat novel for focusing to a very great extent on the Scottish as well as Irish origins of the Ulster Scots who became known as the Scotch-Irish in North America.

In fact, some two thirds of the book's text, 92 out of pages, is dedicated to these by: 4. Very interesting book, especially with regard to the background of the Scotch-Irish in Scotland and Ireland and their history with the Presbyterian Church.

The author covers the period of to when the Scotch-Irish existed as a distinct people. flag 2 likes Like see review Chuck Kollars rated it it was amazing4/5. This admirable book takes a fresh and frank look at the Scotch-Irish, examining with discernment the effect on them of their long migration from Scotland through Ulster to colonial America Soundly conceived and written with insight and verve, the book dispels some common misconceptions of the Scotch-IrishCited by:   The Scots Irish were one of early Pennsylvania’s largest non-English immigrant groups.

They were stereotyped as frontier ruffians and Indian haters. In The Scots Irish of Early Pennsylvania, historian Judith Ridner insists that this immigrant group was socio-economically diverse.

Servants and free people, individuals and families, and /5(2). Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia Volume I Contents Title page Foreword Preface Court Order Book I Pages 9 December through 16 July Pages 16 July through 21 November Pages 22 November through 19 June Pages 19 June through 18 March /8.

Two recent books have promoted Scots-Irish (i.e., The People with No Name: Ireland's Ulster Scots, America's Scots Irish and the Creation of a British Atlantic World, and Born Fighting: How the Scots Irish Shaped America), but titles with Scotch-Irish have always been far more numerous.

2 This can be shown by the holdings in any. The hyphenated term “Scotch-Irish” is an Americanism, generally unknown in Scotland and Ireland and rarely used by British historians. In American usage it refers to people of Scottish descent who, having lived for a time in the north of Ireland, migrated in considerable numbers to the American colonies during the half century before the.

Scotch-Irish (or Scots-Irish) Americans are American descendants of Ulster Protestants who migrated during the 18th and 19th centuries.

In the American Community Survey, million (% of the population) reported Scottish ancestry, an additional 3 million (% of the population) identified more specifically with Scotch-Irish ancestry, and many people who. The Scots-Irish played a large role in the settlement of America, particularly in the southern United States.

Their experiences in settling new lands in Ireland, and then again in the American colonies, helped to develop a hard-working, fearless, and sometimes brash, spirit. Occasionally lawless and violent, the Scots-Irish nevertheless had a. The Scots and Scotch-Irish in America (The In America series) by James E Johnson and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at   This admirable book takes a fresh and frank look at the Scotch-Irish, examining with discernment the effect on them of their long migration from Scotland through Ulster to colonial America.

Soundly conceived and written with insight and verve, the book dispels some common misconceptions of the Scotch-Irish.— Journal of Presbyterian HistoryBrand: The University of North Carolina Press.

The Scotch-Irish in the Carolinas book. Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Absorbing stories of a race of people who created /5.

The Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia: to by Lyman Chalkley is really the best starting place for anyone researching ancestors in Augusta County during this time period.

This three volume series contains most of the abstracts of court records in Augusta County between those dates. The Ulster Scots also called Ulster-Scots people (Ulstèr-Scotch fowk) or, outside the British Isles, Scots-Irish (Scotch-Airisch), are an ethnic group in Ireland, found mostly in the Ulster region and to a lesser extent in the rest of : Charles Hanna.

And, in truth, the Scots-Irish (sometimes also called the Scotch-­Irish) are a force that still shapes our culture.

Their Gifts To America The Scots-Irish brought with them a strong, bottom-up individualism, largely inventing America’s unique populist-style democracy. The Irish Scots and the "Scotch-Irish": an historical and ethnological monograph, with some reference to Scotia Major and Scotia Minor; to which is added a chapter on "How the Irish came as builders of the nation".

(Concord, N.H., The American-Irish Historical Society, ), by. The Scots-Irish DNA Project is open to families of Scots-Irish ancestry. The project has several goals, including reconnecting Scots-Irish in the Diaspora with their families that remained behind in Ireland.

Another goal is to locate a family's point of origin in Scotland and recover lost or forgotten family : Barry R Mccain. The Scotch-Irish of course!. I found a Scottish book fromwhich uses the term “Scotch-Irish” in a translation of a Latin book fromwhere the term “Scotos Hibernicos” is translated as Scotch-Irish - people who are said by the author to have already been long established in Ireland at least back in the ’s, if not.

The Scotch-Irish Mcelroys in Americ: () John McConnell McElroy No preview available - The Scotch-Irish McElroys in America, A. D. A. D. A Social History of the Scotch-Irish. Lanham, Maryland: Madison Books, Johnson, James E. The Scots and Scotch-Irish in America. Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications, ; reprinted, Lehmann, William C.

Scottish and Scotch-Irish Contributions to Early American Life and Culture. The Scots-Irish/Ulster Scots, as their name implies, have their origins in Scotland. A large number of Scottish immigrants arrived in the Northern counties of Ireland during the plantation schemes, from until The plantations were limited to the counties of Antrim, Down, Armagh, Tyrone, Donegal, Cavan, Fermanagh and Derry.